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Russia pushing to partner with NASA on lunar gateway
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Enlarge / NASA's version of what a deep space gateway might look like. (credit: NASA)

Russia is assembling a new group of engineers who will be responsible for crafting the nation’...

arstechnica.com/?p=1240207
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11,000-year-old child’s skeleton tells tale of Native American origins
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Enlarge / Excavations at the Upward Sun River site. (credit: Ben Potter)

Where did Native Americans come from? Over the years, lots of ideas have been considered, but genetic data eventually came down decisively in favor of one of them. Native Americans are most closely related to East Asians and must have...

arstechnica.com/?p=1239161
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Boeing, SpaceX have razor-thin margins to fly crew missions in 2018
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Enlarge / Commercial Crew Astronaut Eric Boe examines hardware during a tour of the SpaceX facility in Hawthorne, California. (credit: NASA)

Almost since the beginning of the commercial crew program in 2010, the old and new titans of the aerospa...

arstechnica.com/?p=1243215
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In 2017, the US led the world in launches for the first time since 2003
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Enlarge / SpaceX's 18th (and final) mission of 2017 put on a show in the skies above Los Angeles. (credit: SpaceX)

For the United States, last year was a watershed in the launch industry. With 29 orbital launches from US soi...

arstechnica.com/?p=1239127
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NASA launches a mission to study Earth’s final frontier—the edge of space
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NASA

The last time scientists got a good look at half the Earth in far ultraviolet light came in 1972, when astronaut John Young snapped some photos with a special camera during a spare moment of the Apollo 16 mission to the Moon. Since then, heliophysicists and other scientists interested in the complicated interplay between Earth’s upper atmosphere and outer space have su...

arstechnica.com/?p=1239783
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Meet “raw” water—ludicrously priced unfiltered water with random bacteria
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Enlarge (credit: Live Water)

Step aside, Juicero—and hold my “raw” water.

Last year, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Doug Evans brought us the Juicero machine,

arstechnica.com/?p=1239005
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Oh snap: How a shrimp closes its claws fast enough to vaporize water
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Where did Mars’ water go? Maybe into the planet’s interior
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Enlarge (credit: Jon Wade and James Moore)

Part of our fascination with cold-and-dry Mars is its warm-and-wet past. What was Mars like when it had liquid water? Did any life swim in it? And where did the water go?

The most obvious explanation for that last question is that Mars’ wa...

arstechnica.com/?p=1236625
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Interstellar visitor might be a comet covered in carbonaceous crud
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Enlarge (credit: ESO/N. Kornmesser/Aurich Lawson)

When the object 1I/2017 U1 ‘Oumuamua was first picked up by telescopes in October, there was no question that it was an odd duck—and that’s saying a lot considering that we recently explored a comet that

arstechnica.com/?p=1235459
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Here are the intriguing toxins that spice up our favorite holiday dishes
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Enlarge / circa 1955: A traditional festive dinner table decorated with sprigs of berried holly. (credit: Getty | Chaloner Woods)

As the adage goes, the dose makes the poison. But the same can be said for our foods...

arstechnica.com/?p=1235341